Walk Ahead for a Brain Tumor Cure

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Survivors, caregivers, family members, brain tumor specialists and other caring members of our community will gather at Sawyer Point Park to participate in the 5th Annual Walk Ahead for a Brain Tumor Cure 5K Walk/Run, benefitting the Brain Tumor Center at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute.

The family-friendly event drew more than 2,300 participants from 19 states and raised over $230,000 in 2013!

To register, donate or volunteer,
please visit www.walkahead.org >>

Date/Time
Date(s) - 10/26/2014
8:00 am - 10:30 am

Location
Yeatman's Cove at Sawyer Point Park

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