Dr. Espay Speaks about Movement Disorders Research in Spanish Media

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Dr. Alberto Espay, neurologist at the Gardner Center for Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders at UC Neuroscience Institute and assistant professor of neurology at the University of Cincinnati, describes his research about movement disorders in the Spanish online publication, Mujer Latina Today.

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Mujer Latina Today

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