Tennis Event Is a ‘Smash’

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“Serve an Ace for Parkinson’s,”  a January event benefiting the Gardner Center for Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders at the UC Neuroscience Institute, assembled many familiar faces for a great cause. The Australian Open-themed evening was complete with a round-robin tennis tournament, food and prizes to raise funds for neurosurgery research at the Gardner Center.

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