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Jordan B. Bonomo, MD

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine

Department
Emergency Medicine
Specialties
Emergency Medicine
.Jordan B. Bonomo, MD photo

Practice Locations

  • Clifton

    • University of Cincinnati Medical Center

      234 Goodman Street
      Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

      Phone: (513) 584-5700
      Map and Directions

Bio

Jordan Bonomo, MD, has been a neuro-intensivist for the UC Neuroscience Institute since 2009, and is the director for the Division of Critical Care in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. Dr. Bonomo is an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine, an assistant professor of Neurosurgery in the Division of Neurocritical care, directs the program in Internal Emergency Medicine for the University of Cincinnati, and is the director of the Neurocritical Care Fellowship at the University of Cincinnati. He has been a member of the University of Cincinnati Stroke Team since 2007, and a flight physician for the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Air Care since 2004.  He was also a tactical physician & assistant medical director for the Cincinnati Police SWAT team for 5 years. The research Dr. Bonomo performs focuses on the management of acute traumatic brain injury as well as the broader topic of critical care. 

Dr. Bonomo, board certified by the American Board of Emergency Medicine with a UCNS Sub-specialty qualification in Neurocritical Care, is also certified in Critical Care Ultrasound by the American College of Chest Physicians.  In 2012, he was honored with the Forty under 40 Award by the Cincinnati Business Courier, and named as one of the Top Doctors in Cincinnati. He is an assistant medical director for LifeCenter, and received the Life Center Award by the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Organ Donation Committee in 2008.  Dr. Bonomo co-founded and continues to lead UC Health Team Haiti, accompanying multiple teams of health care providers affiliated with UC to serve in Port-au-Prince each year.

Dr. Bonomo and his wife, Andrea Rinderknecht, MD, an assistant professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, are committed to supporting the growing role of UC Health in the Greater Cincinnati community. Moving to Cincinnati from the Northeast, he and his wife remain struck by the sincerity and beauty of life in this city, and both are actively engaged in helping the sickest patients in our city receive the best care possible. Dr. Bonomo’s primary goal is to ensure that patients in the Greater Cincinnati area recognize UC Health as the regional leader in emergency and critical care services, with access to some of the best care in the nation.

Education

Medical School
Brown University - Providence, RI
Residency
University of Cincinnati/University Hospital - Cincinnati, OH (Emergency Medicine)
Fellowship
University of Cincinnati/University Hospital - Cincinnati, OH (Neurovascular Emergencies & Neurocritical Care)

Board Certifications

American Board of Emergency Medicine 

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