Study: Delay in Clot Breakup Worsens Outcomes after Ischemic Stroke

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CINCINNATI—Every 30-minute delay in breaking up a blood clot from a stroke was associated with a 10 percent decrease in the probability of a good outcome, regardless of other factors such as stroke severity, according to new research led by a University of Cincinnati (UC) neurologist.

The study, presented today (Friday, Feb. 8) at the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference in Honolulu, was authored by Pooja Khatri, MD, director of acute stroke and associate professor of neurology and rehabilitation medicine at UC and a member of the UC Neuroscience Institute, one of four institutes affiliated with the UC College of Medicine and UC Health.

The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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