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Rebecca S. Cornelius, MD

Associate Professor of Radiology

Department
Radiology
Specialties
Radiology, Imaging, Neuroradiology, Neuroradiology
.Rebecca S. Cornelius, MD photo

Practice Locations

  • Clifton

    • University of Cincinnati Medical Center

      234 Goodman Street
      Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

      Phone: (513) 584-1584
      Map and Directions

Bio

Rebecca Cornelius, MD, joined the UC Health as a neuroradiologist at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center (UCMC) and an assistant professor of radiology at the University of Cincinnati in 1991.  Dr. Cornelius has been a radiologist at the UC Neuroscience Institute since its inception in 1998 and a professor of radiology at the college since 2009. She has a special interest in head & neck imaging, with a secondary appointment as a professor of otolaryngology. Dr. Cornelius also practiced breast imaging for several years at UC.

Dr. Cornelius is a Cincinnati native and is a graduate of McAuley High School and Xavier University. She has spent her entire career in Cincinnati, with 20 of her 22 years in practice exclusively at UCMC.  Her interest in radiology and neuroradiology developed when she began her career as a radiologic technologist, after graduating from the radiologic technology program at Xavier University, where she was class valedictorian. After working for 5 years as a radiologic technologist she decided to pursue a degree in medicine. As a medical student she was selected for the Mayfield Clinic medical student summer fellowship program.

Dr. Cornelius has an interest in global medical care in underserved areas. She has participated in medical mission work in rural Honduras and served as a consultant in the initiation of a telemedicine service at one of the Shoulder to Shoulder (Hombro a Hombro) clinic sites in Concepcion, Intibuca Province, Honduras. She has also traveled with the People to People organization to visit medical facilities in South Africa.

Dr. Cornelius is active in radiology education. She has served in a number of roles as a volunteer with the American Board of Radiology and is currently chair of the neuroradiology section of the diagnostic radiology core certifying exam, as well as serving regularly as an oral examiner for the diagnostic radiology exam and neuroradiology subspecialty exam. She is vice- chair of the neuroradiology section of the American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria panel, which develops guidelines for appropriate utilization of radiology exams for use by referring clinicians. She is a member of the executive committee of the American Society of Head and Neck Radiology and is currently serving as associate editor of the head & neck section of the online journal, Neurographics.

Dr. Cornelius is married and her son is a freshman at University of Minnesota/ Guthrie Theater BFA acting program. She also has 4 stepchildren, 4 grandchildren and 2 very lively boxer dogs.

Education

Medical School
Ohio State University - Columbus, OH
Internship
Good Samaritan Hospital - Cincinnati, OH (General Surgery)
Residency
University of Cincinnati Medical Center - Cincinnati, OH (Diagnostic Radiology)
Fellowship
University of Cincinnati Medical Center - Cincinnati, OH (Neuroradiology)

Board Certifications

American Board of Radiology -Diagnostic Radiology
American Board of Radiology- Subspecialty Qualification in Neuroradiology
Radiologic Society of North America
American Association of Women Radiologists 
American Society of Neuroradiology 
American College of Radiology
American Society of Head & Neck Radiology 
UC Association of Women Faculty
American Medical Association
American Society of Spine Radiology 
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