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William A. Knight IV, MD

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Director, Mid-Level Provider Program

Department
Emergency Medicine
Specialties
Emergency Medicine
.William A. Knight IV, MD photo

Practice Locations

  • Clifton

    • University of Cincinnati Medical Center

      234 Goodman Street
      Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

      Phone: (513) 584-5700
      Map and Directions

Bio

William Knight, MD, is an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine and Neurosurgery at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.  He is a fellowship trained neurointensivist who has been with the UC Neuroscience Institute since 2009, and a member of the University of Cincinnati Stroke Team since 2007.  He is the Mid-Level Provider medical director for the Emergency Department and the Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit (NSICU), and serves as the associate medical director of the NSICU.  He is the medical director for the Lynchburg (OH) Joint Fire and Ambulance District, and has worked as a tactical physician for the Cincinnati SWAT Team.  Dr. Knight still works as a flight physician with UC Health Air Care and Mobile Care. 

Dr. Knight takes special interest in the initial resuscitation of the critically ill and the management of patients with Traumatic Brain Injury and Stroke. He also has an interest in end of life care in the ICU.

Once Dr. Knight completed his undergraduate work at the University of Dayton, he continued on to medical school at the University of Cincinnati.  His residency in Emergency Medicine was done at the University of Cincinnati, where he served as Chief Resident.  Upon completion of a 2-year fellowship in Neurovascular Emergencies and Neurocritical Care at UC, Dr. Knight joined the faculty at UC with a dual appointment in Emergency Medicine and Neurosurgery.  He now works clinically in the Emergency Department, the NSICU, and takes calls with the UC Stroke Team. 

In his free time, Dr. Knight enjoys spending time with his family and training for and running marathons.  He is also an avid Cincinnati Reds and Bengals fan.  

Education

Medical School
University of Cincinnati College of Medicine - Cincinnati, OH
Residency
University of Cincinnati/University Hospital - Cincinnati, OH (Emergency Medicine)
Fellowship
University of Cincinnati/University Hospital - Cincinnati, OH (Neurovascular Emergencies & Neurocritical Care)

Board Certifications

American Board of Emergency Medicine with a UCNS Sub-specialty in Neurocritical Care 
American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP)
Tactical Emergency Medicine, Section of ACEP
Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Neurocritical Care Society
Society of Critical Care Medicine 
American Heart Association

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