Dr. Richard Curry is Catalyst for New Neuro-Oncology Clinics

Share

In his new clinics, Dr. Richard Curry, above, is helping patients who suffer neurologic side-effects of cancer.

Richard Curry, MD, was a medical resident when he realized he had a mind for neurology and a heart for people who had cancer. That duality of thought and feeling led him to pursue a unique fellowship, one that wedded neurology and oncology. More recently, Dr. Curry’s hybrid training has led to the establishment of two new clinics at the UC Neuroscience Institute and the UC Cancer Institute, two of the four institutes of the UC College of Medicine and UC Health.

The two new clinics are:

  • A Neuro-Oncology Clinic for patients with primary or metastatic brain cancer
  • A Neurological Complications of Cancer Clinic for patients with all types of cancer who are suffering neurological side-effects

Dr. Curry, an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology and an Assistant Professor of Neurology, is seeing patients in these clinics at the Barrett Center at the UC Medical Center. He is seeing patients with primary and metastatic brain cancer on Wednesdays (1-4:30 p.m.), and he is seeing patients with all other types of cancer who are experiencing neurologic symptoms on Thursdays (8 a.m.-12 p.m.).

Dr. Curry notes that of all patients who develop cancer, 15 percent will develop neurologic complications, many of which are treatable. Those complications include:

  • headaches
  • seizures
  • stroke
  • neuropathy
  • spasticity
  • increased intracranial pressure
  • leptomeningial disease, which occurs when cancer cells spread to the cerebrospinal fluid that bathes the brain and spinal cord

In his Neuro-Oncology Clinic, Dr. Curry is evaluating and treating two groups of patients: those whose tumors started in the brain and those whose cancer started elsewhere in the body and has metastasized to the brain. “An important focus of this Neuro-Oncology Clinic involves offering early-phase clinical trials to patients with all types of brain tumors,” Dr. Curry says. “The clinic creates a unique opportunity by providing traditional medical oncology treatments for patients with complicated neurologic disease.”

Through the Neurological Complications of Cancer Clinic, Dr. Curry will work closely with patients and their oncologists to develop or fine-tune a treatment plan that takes neurological side-effects into account.

He will spend the rest of his time seeing patients at the UC Medical Center and in his neurology practice, which covers conditions ranging from cerebrovascular disease (stroke) to multiple sclerosis.

Dr. Curry, a graduate of Miami University and the University of Toledo College of Medicine, developed his hybrid approach to cancer and the brain during his neurology residency at UC. A two-month rotation in hematology/oncology awakened him to the rewards of working with cancer patients and their families. And as his residency training continued, his understanding of “the overlap between neurology and cancer” gained clarity and began to crystallize as a vision for his future.

While working with Ronald Warnick, MD, Medical Director of the UC Brain Tumor Center, and the center’s radiation oncologists, Dr. Curry determined that he might be able to develop a special niche at the intersection of neurology and cancer, and he began to investigate fellowships that offered training in that specialized area. Dr. Curry found the fellowship he was looking for at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Dr. Curry says he has been drawn to people with cancer because they share an outlook that is informed by the urgency of their disease.  “They are the most loving patients that you could have,” Dr. Curry says. “They appreciate everything, anything, that you can offer them.

“Usually, in my experience, the patient is the strongest person within his or her family. I’ve always found it inspiring to have patients like that. My patients are one of the main reasons why I enjoy coming to work in the morning.

“It’s refreshing to see patients in my clinic with all kinds of cancer and to be able to say, ‘This is the plan that we designed, and together, we are seeing results.”

This entry was posted in UC Neuroscience Blog and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.
  • Print This Page
  • Make an Appointment: Schedule Now
  • UCNI Weekly Blog
  • Join Our Email List
    for Bi-Monthly Updates

    Click here to continue.
  • Hope Stories

    • Lynne’s Story: Brain Metastasis

      Semiretired and working part-time at a restaurant, Lynne knew something was amiss when she looked at the cash register and then struggled to make her hands produce the correct amount of change. Could she have suffered a stroke? Lynne pushed the...
    • Janis’s Story: Parkinson’s Disease

      Janis's Story: Parkinson's Disease When Janis Yelton gratefully enrolled in a ground-breaking study at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute, one of four institutes of the UC College of Medicine and UC Health, she was wracked by pain from advanced Parkinson’s disease, taking 32...
    • Rick’s Story

      Rick's Story For 45 years Rick coped with his epilepsy. As a young man he experienced undiagnosed “spells,” sensations of muscle tension and déjà vu. Later, as a theme park project manager who traveled the world, he suffered his first “grand mal,”...
    • Zettie’s Story: Aphasia

      Zettie's Story: Aphasia In November of 2004, Zettie Williams confronted what neurologists consider one of the most feared consequences of stroke. When a therapist showed her a photograph of her son, she knew she was looking at her son, but she couldn’t say...
    • Deanna’s Story – Hope

      Deanna's Story - HopeDeanna was averaging three seizures a week when she arrived at the UC Neuroscience Institute. Sometimes her seizures caused her to pass out, and sometimes they left her blinking and wondering where the time had gone. Complicating her situation, Deanna...
    • Renee’s Story: Stroke

      Renee's Story: Stroke When 33-year-old high energy mother Renee Young became ill with the flu in November 2007, the last thing she expected was she was about to suffer a stroke. But that was exactly what happened. As she tried to swallow medication...
    • Jim’s Story: Pituitary Tumor

      Jim's Story: Pituitary Tumor One turn of events led to another, and so it was that Jim, and not his wife, took Jim’s 87-year-old father to his appointment with the dermatologist for the first time. And so it was that the dermatologist was not...
    • Dick’s Story – Memory

      Dick's Story - MemoryDick was enjoying his retirement as a full-time volunteer at Crayons to Computers when his memory began to go awry. He told his granddaughter that his car was due for an oil change, when he had just had the oil...
    • Brian’s Story: Vocal Cord Cyst

      Brian's Story: Vocal Cord Cyst One by one, the symptoms of a throat problem tapped on the pastor’s door. Pastor Brian Tome, leader of Crossroads Church and speaker of five weekly messages to a following of 15,000, acknowledged the symptoms and tried to dismiss them....
    • Courtney’s Story: Traumatic Spine Injury

      Courtney's Story: Traumatic Spine Injury Courtney is positive that she was wearing her seatbelt. Perhaps that is why her head and neck – thankfully -- were fine. Perhaps that is also why her midsection was so violently impacted, as the force of the rollover twisted...