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UCNI Physicians

The University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute (UCNI) is a leading treatment, research and teaching center for complex neurological conditions. Based at the University Hospital and the UC College of Medicine, its physicians and researchers have created national models for evidence-based treatment and research of complex conditions, including ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, brain aneurysms, brain and spinal cord trauma, brain tumors, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis and trigeminal neuralgia.

Our Mission
To advance patient-centered neurologic and psychiatric care, life-changing research, and comprehensive education.

Our Vision
To be the Neuroscience Institute by which all others are measured.

UCNI includes a team of more than 100 experts from 15 specialties who collaborate across disciplines to provide the most comprehensive diagnoses and treatments possible. Key accomplishments of UCNI include:

  1. In 2005 the UC Neuroscience Institute became the first center in Cincinnati and one of 140 nationally to be certified as a national Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). This verifies the center’s adherence to nationally recognized best practices for the treatment of stroke patients. The center was re-certified in 2007.
  2. Affiliated with UC Physicians, UCNI is also home to the UC Stroke Team, which serves as a community resource for the rapid diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients. Neurologists at UCNI have pioneered advanced treatments in stroke and have authored numerous works on this topic.
  3. The Cincinnati Epilepsy Center has earned a level IV rating – the highest rating for epilepsy care – from the National Association of Epilepsy Centers. UCNI treats hundreds of patients annually and has the second highest patient volume in epilepsy treatment in Ohio.
  4. Based at the region’s only Level I adult trauma center, UCNI includes a comprehensive neurotrauma program whose physicians, neurosurgeons and clinicians are specially trained in the treatment of catastrophic injuries to the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nerves.
  5. UCNI’s Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit (NSICU) is headed by the region’s only neurointensivists. These physicians, specially trained in neurocritical care, are dedicated to the treatment of patients who have undergone neurosurgery or who have experienced a stroke, aneurysm rupture or traumatic brain or spine injury.
  6. The NSICU is equipped with state-of-the-art technology to maximize patient outcomes during the critical period that follows surgery or a significant neurological injury. Technologies include 24-hour EEG monitoring of unconscious patients to determine whether seizures are occurring; advanced monitoring of oxygen and blood-flow levels to the brain; and portable CT scanning, which eliminates the risk associated with transporting patients to other parts of the hospital for procedures.
  7. The James J. and Joan A. Gardner Family Center for Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders, one of the most advanced in the country, treats these progressive neurological diseases with best available care and strives to understand them through basic, translational and clinical research.
  8. The Waddell Center for Multiple Sclerosis is a certified member of the National MS Consortium and an affiliate of the National MS Society. Waddell Center clinicians and scientists integrate comprehensive clinical care and advanced diagnostics with basic and translational research and innovative clinical trials.
  9. The UC Brain Tumor Center is internationally renowned for its compassionate team approach, unique image-guided surgical expertise, restorative treatments and basic and clinical research.
  10. The otolaryngologists who are part of UCNI have received national recognition for advancing treatment of smell and taste disorders, swallowing disorders and hearing impairment, and for their work with cochlear and auditory brainstem implants.

If you have unanswered questions about our programs, services or physicians, please contact us at 1-866-941-UCNI (8264), or you can contact one of our Leadership Team members.

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