Contact

Share

Thank you for your interest in the UC Neuroscience Institute. Please use one of the following methods to contact us.

General information

Phone: (866) 941-UCNI (8264)
513-584-2214
Fax: 513-584-6846
E-mail: (use form below please)

Mailing addresses:
UC Neuroscience Institute
234 Goodman Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

Mood Disorders Center
UC Physicians Stetson Building
260 Stetson Street
Suite 3200
Cincinnati, OH  45219

To request a doctor’s appointment or make a referral:

Memory Disorders Center: (513) 584-2214
Mood Disorders Center: (513) 558-7700
Neuromuscular Disorders Program: (513) 584-2214

  • Print This Page
  • Make an Appointment: Schedule Now
  • UCNI Weekly Blog
  • Join Our Email List
    for Bi-Monthly Updates

    Click here to continue.
  • Hope Stories

    • Matt’s Story: Head Injury

      Matt's Story: Head Injury A poor decision nearly cost Matt his life. But state-of-the-art neurosurgical and neurocritical care, dedicated therapists, and family support gave him a chance to start over again. Today, in what is proving to his best decision ever, Matt is studying...
    • Lynne’s Story

      Lynne's StorySemiretired and working part-time at a restaurant, Lynne knew something was amiss when she looked at the cash register and then struggled to make her hands produce the correct amount of change. Could she have suffered a stroke? Lynne pushed the...
    • Brian’s Story – Saving His Voice

      Brian's Story - Saving His Voice One by one, the symptoms of a throat problem tapped on the pastor’s door. Pastor Brian Tome, leader of Crossroads Church and speaker of five weekly sermons to a following of 15,000, acknowledged the symptoms and tried to dismiss them....
    • Janis’s Story: Parkinson’s Disease

      Janis's Story: Parkinson's Disease When Janis Yelton gratefully enrolled in a ground-breaking study at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute, one of four institutes of the UC College of Medicine and UC Health, she was wracked by pain from advanced Parkinson’s disease, taking 32...
    • Amber’s Story: Ruptured Aneurysm

      Amber's Story: Ruptured Aneurysm The only visible sign of Amber Gray’s ordeal is the long slender scar that runs along her forearm. It is the area where a surgeon carefully removed her radial artery, which was needed to bypass a damaged artery in her...
    • Alicia’s Story: Multiple Sclerosis

      Alicia’s Story: Multiple SclerosisAlicia is relishing a life that is filled to the brim: she is a wife, a mother, a runner and a master at living with multiple sclerosis. Diagnosed in the late 1990s, Alicia had “a bumpy ride” in the beginning. But...
    • Deanna’s Story – Hope

      Deanna's Story - HopeDeanna was averaging three seizures a week when she arrived at the UC Neuroscience Institute. Sometimes her seizures caused her to pass out, and sometimes they left her blinking and wondering where the time had gone. Complicating her situation, Deanna...
    • Charles Sabine’s Story: Huntington’s Disease

      Charles Sabine's Story: Huntington's DiseaseIn 2005 the NBC war correspondent Charles Sabine made the life-altering decision to face up to his family history of Huntington’s disease and undergo genetic testing. The odds, he knew, were 50-50 that he, too, had the gene and would...
    • Rick’s Story: Epilepsy

      Rick's Story: Epilepsy Rick’s strategy for managing his epilepsy wasn’t perfect, but it had worked well enough for most of his career as a theme park project manager who traveled the world. Whether he worked in Australia, Malaysia, Singapore or Germany, his routine...
    • Norma’s Story: Essential Tremor

      Norma's Story: Essential TremorQuestion: what progressive neurological condition causes a rhythmic trembling of the head, voice, legs or trunk; can be treated with medication or deep brain stimulation; has no definitive cure; and is eight times more common than Parkinson’s disease? If you’re...