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Thank you for your interest in the UC Neuroscience Institute. Please use one of the following methods to contact us.

General information

Phone: (866) 941-UCNI (8264)
513-584-2214
Fax: 513-584-6846
E-mail: (use form below please)

Mailing addresses:
UC Neuroscience Institute
234 Goodman Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45219

Mood Disorders Center
UC Physicians Stetson Building
260 Stetson Street
Suite 3200
Cincinnati, OH  45219

To request a doctor’s appointment or make a referral:

Memory Disorders Center: (513) 584-2214
Mood Disorders Center: (513) 558-7700
Neuromuscular Disorders Program: (513) 584-2214

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